David Morgen

ENG221.02 RW

T/TH 10 – 11:15

1462 Clifton Rd Building

Room 101

david.morgen@emory.edu

Office location: Callaway N201

Office hours: T/TH 11:30 – 12:30

Sketch showing a person thinking about online environments. Text includes "The future of digital media depends on you and us" and "How do I use social media mindfully and effectively"
Cover of Writing Online: Rhetoric for the Digital Age by George Pullman

Students in this course will develop advanced skills in composing for online and digital new media projects. They will consider the rhetorical and design affordances of multiple new media publishing platforms, both proprietary and open source, and evaluate their effectiveness for different audiences and content. They will explore theories and practices of creating content for linear and non-linear interactive media, begin to practice scripting and storyboarding formats for content development; generating optimized, rhetorically effective content; and using technology to compose collaborative new media projects.

Some of the major projects in this class will include:

  • Creating and publishing a weekly podcast series that examines the affordances and constraints of new media.
  • Investigating economic and social mobility through publicly available statistics on students’ earnings and their parents’ incomes for each college in America, and then collaboratively building a website that presents our questions and findings, and visualizes the data in a compelling manner.
  • Building at least two personal websites, one as a portfolio of your work in this class using WordPress and another site that you code manually using HTML and CSS.
  • Lots of writing and creating digital artifacts.

The promise of the Internet is that it is a great democratizing force, allowing everyone to express their opinions, and everyone to have immediate access to all the world's information. Combine these two, as the Internet and social media do, and you have a virtual world of information and misinformation cohabiting side by side, staring back at you like identical twins, one who will help you and the other who will hurt you. Figuring out which one to choose falls upon all of us, and it requires careful thinking and one thing most of us feel is in short supply: time.
-- Daniel J. Levitin, A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age


Image Credit

Photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash